Cost accounting – Fiscal calendars, fiscal years, and periods

This article discusses fiscal calendars, fiscal years and periods and how to utilize them for legal entities, fixed assets and budgeting.

Fiscal calendars provide a framework for the financial activity of an organization. Each fiscal calendar contains one or more fiscal years, and each fiscal year contains multiple periods. Fiscal calendars can be based on a January 1 to December 31 calendar year, or on any dates that you select. For example, some organizations select a fiscal calendar that starts on July 1 of one year and ends on June 30 of the following year.

There is no limit to the number of fiscal calendars that you can create, and no limit to the number of fiscal years that can be created for a fiscal calendar. Each fiscal calendar is independent of your organization, and can be used by multiple legal entities in the organization. For example, an organization has eight departments and each department is a separate legal entity. Five of them share the same fiscal calendar and three use different fiscal calendars. You can create one fiscal calendar for the five legal entities that share the same fiscal calendar, and then create separate fiscal calendars for the other legal entities.

Create fiscal calendars, fiscal years, and periods

You can create and delete fiscal calendars, fiscal years, and periods on the Fiscal calendars page. You can also divide existing periods and create closing periods that can be used to close a fiscal year.

A closing period is used to separate general ledger transactions that are generated when a fiscal year is closed. When the closing transactions are in one fiscal period, it is easier to create financial statements that either include or exclude different types of closing entries. If a fiscal year is divided into 12 fiscal periods, the closing period is usually the 13th period. However, a closing period can be created from any period that has a status of Open.

When you create a closing period, select a period that has a status of Open and that has the dates that you want to use. The new closing period will copy the starting and ending dates from the existing period. The original period will continue to exist. For example, you select Period 12, which is the last period in the fiscal year, and that has dates of August 1 through August 31. You enter a name for the closing period, such as Close. After you create the new closing period, you now have the original period and the closing period. Both have dates that start on August 1 and end on August 31.

Select fiscal calendars for ledgers, fixed assets, and budget cycles

Fiscal calendars are used with fixed asset depreciation, financial transactions, and budget cycles. When you create a fiscal calendar, you can use it for multiple purposes. You can select a fiscal calendar for a fixed asset book to make it a fixed asset calendar. You can select a fiscal calendar for a ledger to make it a ledger calendar. And you can select a fiscal calendar for a budget cycle to make it a budget calendar. You can use the same fiscal calendar for all of these.

Select the fiscal calendar that you want to use for the ledger for your legal entity in the Ledger form. A fiscal calendar must be selected on the Ledger page for every legal entity. After a fiscal calendar is selected, you can set up period statuses and permissions on the Ledger calendar page for any of the periods that are part of a fiscal year.

Select a fiscal calendar for fixed assets

You can select a fiscal calendar for a fixed asset book, and that fiscal calendar will be used by the fixed assets that use the selected book. You can select from any fiscal calendar that is defined on the Fiscal calendars page.

Define budget cycle time spans

Budget cycles are the length of time during which a budget is used. Budget cycles can include part of a fiscal year or multiple fiscal years, such as a biennial budget cycle of two years or a triennial budget cycle of three years. The budget cycle time span defines the number of periods that are included in the budget cycle. To specify the budget cycle time span, use the Budget cycle time spans page.

Maintain periods for your organization

You can use the Ledger calendar page to view the details of the fiscal calendar, fiscal years, and periods used by your organization. You can also change the status of the periods and select which users can post accounting transactions to periods. For example, at the start of a new period, you might want a group of users to finish posting financial transactions in the previous period, while other groups work only in the new period.

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Accounts Payable – Invoice matching and intercompany purchase orders

The purchasing legal entity that is involved in an intercompany trade transaction might be set up to use accounts payable invoice matching. When the Post invoice with discrepancies field in the Accounts payable parameters form is set to Require approval, invoice matching validation will be performed. In this case, the posting requirements for both intercompany trade and accounts payable invoice matching must be met before intercompany vendor invoices can be posted.

The examples in this topic use the following setup for intercompany trade:

  • Fabrikam Purchase is the purchasing legal entity.
  • Fabrikam Sales is the selling legal entity.
  • Customer 4020 exists in Fabrikam Sales.
  • Vendor 3024 exists in Fabrikam Purchase.
  • In Fabrikam Purchase, intercompany information is specified for vendor 3024. Fabrikam Sales is specified as the customer company, and customer 4020 is specified as the customer account that corresponds to the Fabrikam Purchase legal entity.
  • In Fabrikam Sales, intercompany information is specified for customer 4020. Fabrikam Purchase is specified as the vendor company, and vendor 3024 is specified as the vendor account that corresponds to the Fabrikam Sales legal entity.

The examples use the following setup for accounts payable invoice matching for Fabrikam Purchase:

  • On the Accounts payable parameters page, the Enable invoice matching validation option is selected.
  • On the Accounts payable parameters page, the Post invoice with discrepancies field is set to Require approval.
  • The price tolerance percentage for the legal entity is 2 percent.

Example: Price matching and intercompany trade

The net amounts for the intercompany vendor invoice and the intercompany customer invoice must be equal. This requirement overrides any invoice matching approvals or price tolerance percentages that apply. For example, you follow these steps.

  1. In Fabrikam Purchase, create sales order SO888 for customer 4020. Intercompany purchase order ICPO222 is automatically created for vendor 3024 in Fabrikam Purchase, and sales order ICSO888 is automatically created in Fabrikam Sales.
  2. In Fabrikam Sales, register that the items have been received, and post a packing slip. The status of ICSO888 changes to Delivered. The status of ICPO222 changes to Received.
  3. In Fabrikam Sales, perform an invoice update for ICSO888. The unit price is 0.45, and 100 items are updated.
  4. In Fabrikam Purchase, create an invoice for ICPO222. You accidentally change the net price from 45.00 to 54.00. An icon is displayed to indicate that the price exceeds the allowable price tolerance of 2 percent.
  5. On the Invoice matching details page, select the option to approve posting with matching discrepancies. On the Vendor invoice page, click OK. If the vendor invoice was not an intercompany vendor invoice, posting would be successful. However, because you are working with an intercompany vendor invoice, posting is unsuccessful. For intercompany trade, the invoice totals on the intercompany sales order must equal the invoice totals on the corresponding intercompany purchase order. To resolve this issue, you must correct the net price on the invoice by changing the net price back to the default amount, 45.00.

Example: Quantity matching with intercompany trade

The quantities on the intercompany purchase order and the intercompany sales order must be equal. This requirement overrides any invoice matching approvals that apply. This example uses the following additional setup for intercompany trade:

  • In Fabrikam Purchase, the purchase order action policy for vendor 3024 is set up to automatically post both the original customer invoice and the intercompany vendor invoice.

This example uses the following additional setup for accounts payable invoice matching for Fabrikam Purchase:

  • On the Item model groups page for the model group that is used by item B-R14, the Receiving requirements option is selected.
  • The on-hand quantity for item B-R14 is 0 (zero).

For example, you follow these steps.

  1. In Fabrikam Purchase, create sales order SO999 for customer 4020. The order contains one line item: 100 batteries (item B-R14) at a unit price of 1.00 each. Intercompany purchase order ICPO333 is automatically created for vendor 3024 in Fabrikam Purchase, and sales order ICSO999 is automatically created in Fabrikam Sales.
  2. In Fabrikam Sales, perform an invoice update for ICSO999. Posting is unsuccessful, because the item is out of stock and has not yet been received. Therefore, the financial information cannot be updated.
  3. In Fabrikam Sales, register that the items have been received, and post a packing slip for ICSO999. A product receipt for ICPO333 is automatically posted in Fabrikam Purchase. In Fabrikam Purchase, the received quantity for item B-R14 changes to 100.
  4. In Fabrikam Sales, perform an invoice update for ICSO999. Posting is successful in both legal entities. In Fabrikam Purchase, the quantity that is purchased for item B-R14 changes to 100.

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Asset Management – Functional location lifecycle states

This topic describes how to set up functional location lifecycle states and lifecycle models in Asset Management. Functional location lifecycle states define the states that a functional location can go through, for example, created, active, and ended. You are able to view all functional locations, regardless of their lifecycle state, in the All functional locations list page. You can change the state of a functional location by selecting it in the All functional locations list page and selecting Update functional location state.

Set up functional location lifecycle states

  1. Select Asset management > Setup > Functional locations > Lifecycle states.
  2. Select New to create a new functional location state.
  3. Insert the state ID in the Lifecycle state field and a name for the functional location state in the Name field. In the Lifecycle models field, you can see the number of functional location lifecycle models that uses the functional location state.
  4. On the General FastTab, select “Yes” on the Active toggle button if the functional location should be active at this state.
  5. Select “Yes” on the Create assets toggle button if it should be possible to automatically create an asset with the same name as the functional location and install it on the functional location at this state.

Note

This toggle button relates to the Asset type field on the General FastTab in the Functional location types form (Asset management > Setup > Functional locations > Functional location types). 6. Select “Yes” on the Rename location toggle button if it should be possible to change the name of the functional location at this state. 7. Select “Yes” on the New sub locations toggle button if it should be possible to add new sub locations to the functional location at this state. 8. Select “Yes” on the Install assets toggle button if it should be possible to install assets on the functional location at this state. 9. Select “Yes” on the Delete functional location toggle button if it should be possible to delete the functional location at this state. 10. Select an asset state in the Lifecycle state field if you want the asset lifecycle state for all assets installed on the functional location to be automatically updated at this state. Example: If you close down a functional location, and set the functional location lifecycle state to “Ended”, you may want to automatically change the lifecycle state of the assets installed on that functional location to “Not in use”.

Note

Functional location lifecycle states, lifecycle models, and types are related and used in the same way as work order lifecycle states, work order lifecycle models, and work order types.

Set up functional location lifecycle models

When you have created the lifecycle states required for your functional locations, they can be divided into groups. This is done to create the lifecycle model flow that may be used for different types of functional locations. As a minimum, one standard functional location lifecycle model should be created.

  1. Select Asset management > Setup > Functional locations > Lifecycle models.
  2. Select New to create a new lifecycle model.
  3. Insert the lifecycle model ID in the Lifecycle model field and a name for the lifecycle model in the Name field. In the Functional location types and Lifecycle states fields, you can see the number of functional location types that uses the lifecycle model and the number of states selected in the lifecycle model.
  4. On the Lifecycle states FastTab, select the states that should be included in the model. This is done by clicking on a state in the Lifecycle states remaining section and clicking the forward arrow button.
  5. If you want to select all the available states for a model, click the select all available stages button. All states are transferred to the Lifecycle states selected section.
  6. If you want to remove a selected state from the model, select the state in the Lifecycle states selected section and then select the back arrow button.
  7. Select Lifecycle state updates to define which lifecycle states can follow a selected state.

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Use Accounts receivable to track customer invoices and incoming payments

You can create customer invoices that are based on sales orders or packing slips. You can also enter free text invoices that are not related to sales orders. You can receive payments by using several different payment types. These include bills of exchange, cash, checks, credit cards, and electronic payments. If your organization includes multiple legal entities, you can use centralized payments to record payments in a single legal entity on behalf of the other legal entities.

Business processes

Business process

Set up Accounts receivable

Use Accounts receivable to track customer invoices and payments that you receive from customers. You can set up customer groups, customers, posting profiles, interest notes, collection letters, commissions, and parameters regarding customers, charges, deliveries and destinations, bills of exchange, and other types of Accounts receivable information.

Set up credit and collections

Accounts receivable collections information is managed in one central view, the Collections page. Credit and collections managers can use this central view to manage collections. Collections agents can begin the collections process from customer lists that are generated by using predefined collection criteria, or from the Customers page.

Credit and collections in Accounts receivable

Configure Accounts receivables and Credit and collections

Set up Credit and collections

Set up payments and settlements

Accept different types of payments from customers, such as bills of exchange, cash, checks, credit cards, and electronic payments.

You can find original article here

Asset management overview

Asset Management is an advanced module for managing assets and maintenance jobs in Dynamics 365 Supply Chain Management. Asset Management integrates seamlessly with several modules in Finance and Operations apps.

The image below is an illustration of the interfaces to other modules in Finance and Operations.

Overview of how Asset Management integrates

Asset Management enables you to efficiently manage and carry out tasks related to managing and servicing many types of equipment in your company, for example, machines, production equipment, and vehicles. Asset Management supports solutions across numerous industries.

You can find original article here

Configure Accounts payable overview

Prerequisites for Accounts payable setup

Before you can set up Accounts payable, you must complete the following setup:

  • In General ledger:
    • If you plan to use payment journals, set up payment journals.
    • If you plan to run exchange rate adjustments, set up currency codes on the Currencies page, set up exchange rate types on the Exchange rate types page, and set up currency exchange rates on the Currency exchange rates page.
  • In Cash and bank management, set up bank accounts to use with methods of payment.

Setup pages for Accounts payable

Use the following pages to set up the basic functionality of Accounts payable for each legal entity. The pages are listed in the recommended order of setup. To make the setup process easier, you can create templates from the first records that you create. In a template, values are typically entered in many fields to reflect the features that the organization wants to implement for a particular type of vendor.

  1. On the Terms of payment page, define the terms of payment that you assign to sales orders, purchase orders, customers, and vendors, and that determine invoice due dates. For more information, see Define vendor payment fees.
  2. On the Methods of payment – vendors page, create and maintain information about how the organization pays its vendors.
  3. On the Vendor groups page, create and maintain groups of vendors that share important parameters for posting, settlement and payment, reporting, and forecasting.
  4. On the Vendor posting profiles page, define how vendor transactions are posted to the general ledger.
  5. On the Accounts payable parameters page, set up default settings that are applied if a more specific setting isn’t specified, parameters for various kinds of functionality, and the various number sequences for Accounts payable.
  6. On the Form setup page, define the format of various documents that are related to vendors, and that the organization uses to keep track of receipts from vendors and enter reasons for the flow of payments to vendors.
  7. On the Vendors page, create and maintain vendor accounts, and also the tax authorities that your organization reports sales taxes to.

Optional setup pages for Accounts payable

In addition to the basic functionality, Accounts payable has other functionality that you can set up.

The additional setup pages are organized by functionality.

Policies

  • On the Vendor invoice policy page, set up vendor invoice policies.

Invoice matching

  • On the Invoice totals tolerances page, set up tolerances for invoice totals.
  • On the Matching policy page, set up two-way and three-way matching policies.
  • On the Price tolerances page, set up tolerances for unit prices.
  • On the Item price tolerance groups page, set up tolerance groups for item prices.
  • On the Vendor price tolerance groups page, set up tolerance groups for vendor prices.
  • On the Charges tolerances page, set up tolerances for charges.

Workflow

  • On the Accounts payable workflows page, set up workflow configurations for journal approvals and purchase requisitions.

Reasons

  • On the Vendor reasons page, set up reason codes.

Charges

  • On the Charges code page, set up codes for the charges that are used in purchase orders.
  • On the Vendor charges group page, create and maintain charges groups for vendors.
  • On the Item charge groups page, create and maintain charges groups for items.
  • On the Auto charges page, define the charges that are automatically assigned to orders.

Supplementary items

  • On the Supplementary item groups – Vendor page, create and maintain supplementary item groups for vendors.
  • On the Supplementary item groups – Inventory page, create and maintain supplementary item groups for items.

Distribution

  • On the Terms of delivery page, create and maintain the conditions for an item’s transfer from seller to buyer.
  • On the Modes of delivery page, create and maintain the methods of transport that are used when an order is delivered from the seller to the buyer.
  • On the Destination codes page, create and maintain identifiers and descriptions for delivery destinations.

Forms

  • On the Form notes page, create the standard text that appears on various pages.
  • On the Form sorting parameters page, set up the sorting order for requisitions, receipt lists, packing slips, and invoices.
  • On the Print management setup page, set up print management information for originals and copies of pages.

Payments

  • On the Cash discounts page, set up and manage the terms for obtaining cash discounts. The cash discount codes are linked to vendors and are applied to purchase orders.
  • On the Payment schedules page, set up the payment schedules that are used to manage installment payments to vendors.
  • On the Payment days page, define the payment days that are used to calculate due dates, and specify payment days for a specific day of the week or month.
  • On the Payment fee page, create and maintain the payment fees that are associated with vendors.
  • On the Payment instruction page, create and maintain payment instructions.

Statistics

  • On the Aging period definitions page, set up user-defined intervals that are used to analyze the maturity distribution of vendor accounts.
  • On the Line of business page, create the line of business (LOB) codes that are assigned to vendors.

Tax 1099

  • On the 1099 fields page, verify and update the minimum amounts that must be reported to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), based on the latest IRS requirements.

Optional setup for other modules

Organization administration

  • On the Number sequences page, set up number sequence groups for invoice numbers.
  • On the following pages, set up address information:
    • Address setup
    • NAF codes
    • Import ZIP/postal codes

General ledger

  • On the Financial dimensions page, set up financial dimensions.
  • On the following pages, set up tax information:
    • Sales tax codes
    • Sales tax groups
    • Item sales tax groups
    • Account group
    • Sales tax exempt codes
    • Sales tax jurisdictions
    • Sales tax authorities
    • Sales tax settlement periods

You can find the original article here

Today I will show you how to initiate a manual failover and how to perform a fallback on your IOT-hub

By default, the IoT Hub service provides intra-region High Availability by implementing redundancies in almost all layers of the service. The SLA published by the IoT Hub service is achieved by making use of these redundancies. No additional work is required by the developers of an IoT solution to take advantage of these High Availability features.

Although IoT Hub offers a reasonably high uptime guarantee, transient failures can still be expected as with any distributed computing platform. If you’re just getting started with migrating your solutions to the cloud from an on-premise solution, your focus needs to shift from optimizing “mean time between failures” to “mean time to recover”. In other words, transient failures are to be considered normal while operating with the cloud in the mix. Appropriate retry policies must be built into the components interacting with a cloud application to deal with transient failures.

Manual failover is a feature of the IoT Hub service that allows customers to failover their hub’s operations from a primary region to the corresponding Azure geo-paired region. Manual failover can be done in the event of a regional disaster or an extended service outage. You can also perform a planned failover to test your disaster recovery capabilities, although it is recommended that a test IoT hub is used rather than one running in production as the solution is unavailable during the failover process.

Azure IoT Hub Manual Failover You should note that there is a limit of two failovers and two failbacks per day for an IoT Hub.

Complete the following steps:
1. In your Web browser, to open your Azure portal, navigate to the portal.azure.com. When you log into Azure you will arrive at the Azure portal home page for your Azure account.

2. In the top-left corner of your Azure portal, under Favorites click Resource groups.
3. In the Resource groups blade, select the resource group name you are using.
4. In the Resource group blade, in the list of resources, click the Storage account you have created.
5. Under Resiliency on the IoT Hub blade, click Manual failover (preview).
6. On the Manual Failover pane, read and note the warning: Use this feature to failover your IoT hub to the secondary location. This action will cause down time and telemetry loss to your solution.

This is a long running operation and could take several minutes to finish. Please exercise with caution when using it.

7. On the Manual failover pane, you see the IoT Hub Primary Location and the IoT Hub Secondary Location.

The primary location is initially set to the location you specified when you created the IoT hub, and always indicates the location in which the hub is currently active. The secondary location is the standard Azure geo-paired region that is paired to the primary location. You cannot change the location values.

8. At the top of the Manual failover pane, click Initiate failover.

9. On the Confirm manual failover pane note the warning: Warning! This action can’t be canceled. Your IoT hub will be activated in the secondary location.

In order to move your IoT hub back to the original location, you will have to trigger the failover again after the current operation succeeds.

10. Under Iot hub name, enter the name of your IoT hub and click OK. This confirms your desire to failover.

Note that you can use the mouse to select and copy the IoT hub name from another area of the web page. The amount of time it takes to perform the manual failover is proportional to the number of devices that are registered for your hub. For example, if you have 100,000 devices, it might take 15 minutes, but if you have five million devices, it might take an hour or longer.

While the manual failover process is running, there is a banner on the Manual Failover pane that tells you a manual failover is in progress. After a processing period, you will get a notification that your IoT Hub failover has been completed successfully. After it’s finished, the primary and secondary regions on the Manual Failover page are flipped and the hub is active again. Azure IoT Hub Failback After you have performed a manual failover, you can switch the hub’s operations back to the original primary region – this is called a failback. If you have just performed a failover, you must wait about an hour before you can request a failback. If you try to perform the failback in a shorter amount of time, an error message is displayed.

A failback is performed just like a manual failover.

These are the steps:
1. To perform a failback, return to the Iot Hub pane for your Iot hub.
2. Under Resiliency on the IoT Hub pane, click Manual failover.
3. At the top of the Manual failover pane, click Initiate failover. You see the Confirm manual failover pane.
4. In the Confirm manual failover pane, under Iot hub name, enter the name of your IoT hub and click OK.

As before, the amount of time it takes to perform the manual failover is proportional to the number of devices that are registered for your hub. For example, if you have 100,000 devices, it might take 15 minutes, but if you have five million devices, it might take an hour or longer. While the manual failover process is running, there is a banner on the Manual Failover pane that tells you a manual failover is in progress. After a processing period, you will get a notification that your IoT Hub failover has been completed successfully. After it’s finished, the primary and secondary regions on the Manual Failover page are flipped and the hub is active again.

Verify Device-to-Cloud Communication

Now you will verify that device-to-cloud communication is taking place by using the Serial Monitor in Visual Studio Code and checking your Azure Portal.

  1. Ensure that you have your GetStarted project opened in Visual Studio Code and that your device is connected to you PC.
  2. In Visual Studio Code, examine the status bar that runs along the bottom of the window.
  3. Hover your mouse pointer over each of the buttons on the status bar. You should see label appear that identifies the purpose associated with the buttons.
  4. Use the button labels to locate the following buttons:
    • Show Board Config
    • Open Serial Monitor
    • Select Serial Port
    The Open Serial Monitor button is the button displaying the icon that looks like a power plug.
  1. In Visual Studio Code, on the bottom status bar, click the Select Serial Port button.
  2. At the top of the Visual Studio Code window, notice the prompt asking you to “Select a serial port”.
  3. At the prompt, select the COM port labeled STMicroelectronics You may recall seeing the STMicroelectronics name pop up when you were configuring your MXChip device. The STMicroelectronics driver is used to communicate with the MXChip AZ3166 device.
  4. On the bottom status bar, click the Baud Rate button, and then click 115200 If your application is running successfully, you see something similar to the following:
  1. Open a browser window and navigate to your Azure portal: portal.azure.com You should see your dashboard and the Resources tile. If you don’t, verify that you are logged in with the Azure account and subscription that you are using.
  2. Open your IoT Hub, and review the information displayed on the Overview blade.
  3. Notice that the IoT Hub Usage tile shows you that messages are arriving at your IoT Hub.

Register Your MXChip Device with IoT Hub

Every IoT hub has an identity registry that stores information about the devices that are permitted to connect to it. Before a device can connect to an IoT hub, there must be an entry for that device in the IoT hub’s identity registry. A device must also authenticate with the IoT hub based on credentials stored in the identity registry.

In this task, you will register your MXChip AZ3166 device with your IoT Hub.

  1. Ensure that you have the GetStarted sample open in Visual Studio Code and that your MXChip AZ3166 device is connected to your PC.
  2. In the Visual Studio Code window, press Ctrl + P.
  3. At the prompt, to select the task that will provision your device, type task c and then click cloud-provision
  1. When prompted within the command line instructions, select the Azure subscription that you are using, and then press Enter The provisioning process will then check your subscription for an IoT Hub that it can use.
  2. When prompted within the command line instructions, select the IoT Hub that you created earlier, and then press Enter. You should see an option to select the hub that you created.
  3. When prompted that the provisioning process is complete, press Enter. You device, which has been named AZ3166, has now been registered with your IoT Hub. You can open you Azure portal to verify that it was created.
  4. Open a browser window and navigate to your Azure portal.
  5. On your dashboard, use your Resources tile to open your IoT Hub. Click the IoT Hub resource to open it.
  6. On the Overview blade, notice that the IoT Hub Usage tile now indicates that you have 1 IoT Device.
  7. On the left-side menu, click *IoT devices.
  8. Notice that a device has been created with the device ID set to “AZ3166”.

Configure the MXCHip Dev Environment

Now it’s time to set up the development environment

  1. Download and install the Arduino IDE
    • Windows: Use Windows Installer version Important: Do not select the installer for the Windows App, select the Windows installer version. The Windows installer is a .exe file that will install the Arduino IDE to the C:\Program Files (x86) folder location.You can download and save the installer before running it if you want – it is named something similar to the following: arduino-1.8.8-windows.exe
  2. Launch Visual Studio Code
  3. Open the Extensions panel with the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + X
  4. Search for azure workbench
  5. Click on the Azure IoT Device Workbench extension
  6. Click Install
  7. Once the extension is finished installing, click Reload
  8. Open the Visual Studio Code preferences with the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + ,
  9. Click the {} icon in the upper right hand corner of the window to edit the JSON
  10. Add the following JSON to your User settings file.

“arduino.path”: “C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Arduino”, “arduino.additionalUrls”: “https://raw.githubusercontent.com/VSChina/azureiotdevkit_tools/master/package_azureboard_index.json”,

On the File menu, click Save All, and then close and restart Visual Studio Code. When Visual Studio Code restarts you may see some installation tasks launch. Follow the on-screen instruction to complete the installation process if needed.

  1. On the File menu, click Save All, and then close and restart Visual Studio Code. When Visual Studio Code restarts you may see some installation tasks launch. Follow the on-screen instruction to complete the installation process if needed.
  2. Press F1 to open the command palette
  3. Type Board Manager
  4. Select Arduino: Board Manager and press Enter
  5. In the search box, type az3166 Note: There should be one item titled MXChip – Microsoft Azure IoT Developer Kit by Microsoft Developer.
  6. Select the latest version from the drop down, and then click Install

ST-Link Configuration

The USB interface used to communicate with your MXChip is ST-Link.

Windows

Download and install USB driver from STMicro.

Next time i will show you how to register your MXChip device with IoT hub.